Agenda

BIOLOGY & CARE OF FERRETS
Speaker: Bambi Jasmin, Attending Veterinarian – Marshall BioResources
 

This talk will review the biology and care of the domestic ferret. It will highlight the differences in the housing and care of ferrets in a production facility versus a laboratory setting, and discuss some of the common challenges encountered. It will also cover some of the questions most frequently asked by research institutions and what Marshall BioResources has learned about caring for ferrets in their nearly 80 years of raising them.

 

 

LABORATORY RABBIT BEHAVIORAL MANAGEMENT & SOCIAL HOUSING
Speaker: Annie J. Valuska, Feeding Behavior Senior Scientist, R&D ‒ Nestlé-Purina PetCare
 

Social enrichment has become an increasingly popular strategy for improving the welfare of laboratory animals. It is widely believed that rabbits would benefit from social housing, but many laboratories in the United States are finding it challenging to implement due to high levels of injurious aggression that occur when adult rabbits are housed together. Given these challenges, there is a pressing need for a better understanding of rabbit social behavior and improved strategies for managing rabbits’ social environment.

 

In this presentation, the natural history of the European rabbit, including their social structure and aggressive behavior, will be discussed in order to frame an understanding of laboratory rabbit behavior. The reigning belief that rabbits should be socially housed will be challenged, using findings from studies on wild, laboratory, and farmed rabbits, which will be presented in-depth. Finally, the specific properties of current housing strategies that may lead to aggression will be explored and suggestions for managing aggression ‒ and a novel paradigm for understanding and managing rabbits’ social environment and welfare ‒ will be provided.

 

 

UNDERSTANDING COMPASSION FATIGUE
Speaker: Julie Squires, Certified Coach ‒ Rekindle Solutions
 

The purpose of this talk is to gain understanding and awareness of compassion fatigue, burnout, secondary trauma, and moral stress as they each apply to lab animal research workers. While these are the negative aspects of the work, the presentation will also focus on compassion satisfaction, the positive aspects of the work, and workers’ compelling reasons for being involved in it. It is the balance of these that bring about professional quality of life. Upon completion, participants will be able to understand and recognize compassion fatigue, connect to their own motivation for doing this work, and see how the balance creates wellbeing.

 

 

AN EVIDENCE-BASED APPROACH TO ZEBRAFISH HEALTH MANAGEMENT
Speaker: Nick King, Director of Operations ‒ Fish Vet Group
 

Health monitoring (HM) of zebrafish in aquatic labs across the US has not yet risen to the same level of harmonization as their mammalian counterparts. Instead, aquatic HM programs are a reflection of the broad range in oversight (PI, Lab Manager, Attending Veterinarian), and can vary from “no monitoring at all” to a highly focused SPF program. A majority of facilities take a minimalist approach for the sake of “doing something”. However, with more attention toward health as an extrinsic factor affecting study robustness, repeatability, and impact on fish welfare, health monitoring has come to the front of many discussions involving zebrafish husbandry and research.

 

Evidence-based health management starts with, and routinely determines, the baseline health status of the defined population. It then follows with targeted sampling of moribund fish as a means to characterize disease and identify pathogens that emerge from the population to affect susceptible individuals. This lecture will outline a risk-based approach to zebrafish HM, not based on analogies with rodent testing, but instead using accepted models for regulatory and best practices in fish husbandry.

 

 

ASSESSMENT OF VOLUNTARY BEHAVIOR USING THE CATWALK XT GAIT ANALYSIS SYSTEM IN CHRONIC AND INFLAMMATORY MOUSE MODELS OF PAIN: AN IN-DEPTH ANALYSIS
Speaker: Claudia Pitzer – Interdisciplinary Neurobehavioral Core (INBC), University of Heidelberg
 

The assessment of voluntary behavior related to gait and coordination can be efficiently used for measuring pain-related behaviors and can be combined with standard stimulus-evoked pain measurement for increasing the confidence in behavioral results in mouse models of pain. This presentation will describe a new in-depth analysis of gait and coordination of two mouse models of chronic and inflammatory pain using the Noldus CatWalk system. It will include a standard operating protocol on how to set up an experiment to acquire and analyze data to guarantee a reproducible and reliable gait analysis in mouse models of pain. Some potential pitfalls to be overcome when using the CatWalk will also be discussed.

 

Upon completion, attendees will be able to recognize the importance of a well-established and well-conducted behavior analysis to increase the reliability and validity of the mouse models and thereby guarantee the quality of behavioral analysis.

 

 

PAIN ASSESSMENT METHODS IN MICE
Speaker: Jennie Lofgren, Global Head of Animal Welfare and Compliance ‒ Novartis
 

The purpose of this talk is to gain understanding and awareness of compassion fatigue, burnout, secondary trauma, and moral stress as they each The purpose of this talk is to describe approaches for pain assessments in rodents for an intended audience of veterinarians and those responsible for care and oversight of laboratory rodents. The talk will describe several different methods for assessing pain in rodents, the common pitfalls and challenges to accurate pain assessment in these species, and promising new methods for point-of-care use. Upon completion, attendees will be able to select from a range of pain evidence-based assessment tools for use in their rodent programs.

 

 

BASIC METHODS FOR PREOPERATIVE PREPARATION OF SWINE
Speakers: Marissa Wolfe, Clinical Veterinarian; Mary Ann McCrackin, Veterinary Medical Officer – Medical University of South Carolina
 

This presentation will lead beginning and intermediate learners through a visual journey of swine preoperative preparation. Topics include administration of pre-anesthetic drugs and pre-emptive analgesia, anesthetic induction and intubation, IV catheter placement, initial skin preparation (i.e., “rough prep”), intraoperative monitoring, final skin preparation (i.e., “sterile prep”), and sterile draping. More than one technique will be presented when possible (e.g., positions for intubation). Key points relevant to laboratory animal medicine board preparation will be addressed such as swine-specific drug doses, equipment, and anatomy.

 

 

PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE CARE AND USE OF BIRDS IN RESEARCH
Speakers: Douglas K. Taylor, Senior Clinical Veterinarian and Associate Professor; Vannessa K. Lee, Clinical Veterinarian and Assistant Professor; Cristin Roach, Clinical Veterinarian and Instructor ‒ Emory University
 

Avian species are used relatively infrequently in biomedical research compared to other species such as mice; however, they serve as important models in studies of toxicology, behavior, immunology, and infectious disease research. Songbirds, pigeons, Japanese quail, and chickens are among the most commonly used species, and will serve as the basis for this presentation. Topics to be discussed include the practical aspects of avian biology and physiology, care in the research facility, select diseases, concerns with zoonoses, commonly used techniques, and current research models. The objective is to help participants gain practical, functional knowledge for working with birds.

 

Online
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Sept. 2018

—to—
Sept. 2019

© 2018 Charles River Laboratories International, Inc.