Agenda

Developing an Exclusion List:  What to Test for and When
Speaker: Julie Watson, Associate Professor, Dept. of Molecular & Comparative Pathobiology – Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

The purpose of this talk is to provide information to veterinarians to consider when developing or modifying an appropriate organism exclusion list for their research rodent facilities. There is no “one-size fits all” when developing a facility exclusion list. This talk will provide practical advice on implementing an exclusion list, including preventing entry of excluded organisms, monitoring for compliance, and dealing with outbreaks. Some of the pitfalls associated with keeping multiple levels of exclusion within one facility will be discussed. Upon completion, attendees will be able to develop an exclusion list for their facility that meets the research needs of their investigators and that can be implemented and maintained with available resources. They will also be able to implement a plan for monitoring for excluded organisms and removing excluded organisms should they be detected.

 

Common Endo- AND Ectoparasites:  DeTEction and Exclusion
Speaker: Philip Gerwin, Principal Scientist & Clinical Veterinarian – Pfizer

The objective of this presentation is to provide a thorough review of prevalent murine parasitic pathogens for laboratory animal professionals. The lecture will discuss the prevalence, morphology, life cycle, effects on health and research, diagnostic tests, and exclusion strategies for common endoparasites and ectoparasites of laboratory mice and rats. Emphasis will be placed on comparing traditional and contemporary detection methods, with a particular focus on the role of PCR testing in modern vivaria, using data from recent and soon to be published studies. Upon completion of this lecture, attendees will be able to identify the commonly encountered murine parasites, appreciate the advantages and disadvantages of pertinent diagnostic testing modalities, and understand how to employ up-to-date parasite exclusion strategies to optimize their institution’s murine biosecurity programs.

 

Keeping it Under One Roof: Managing Different Health Profiles
Speaker: Laura Conour, Director, Lab Animal Resources – Princeton University

Managing different health profiles in centralized animal facilities could be a recipe for disaster or an appreciated customer service-based approach to meet your researchers’ needs. There are several key operational and training approaches that are necessary to ensure your biosecurity is maintained at the levels designated. Some of these approaches involve practices by the laboratory animal staff while others require training and more importantly, an understanding of procedures by research staff. A risk assessment of the health profiles of your rodent populations as it relates to the layout and features of the animal facilities is a must along with consideration of your level of confidence in the compliance of your staff as well as the researchers. Approaches and operational and training considerations will be discussed.

 

Infectious Diseases of Nonhuman Primates: Clinical and Specific Pathogen Free Agents
Speaker: JoAnne Yee, Pathogen Detection Laboratory Core Manager - California National Primate Research Center & UC – Davis

Infectious agents can pose a threat to the individual and overall colony health of nonhuman primates, and to their maximal utility as animal models for biomedical research. An understanding of the pathobiology of these agents can help to prevent their introduction into and/or limit their impact in colonies. Some commonly isolated agents associated with diarrhea and other gastrointestinal problems include Campylobacter and Shigella bacteria. Klebsiella and Streptococcus bacteria are commonly associated with respiratory signs. To avoid morbidity, mortality, and variability confounding research data, many studies require specific pathogen free (SPF) animals. The National Institutes of Health minimal definition of SPF for macaques includes simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), simian betaretrovirus retrovirus (SRV, also known as type D retrovirus), simian T-lymphotropic virus (STLV) and macacine herpesvirus 1 (McHV1, also known as B-virus). The biology, pathogenesis, pathology, transmission, prevention, and detection of these and other commonly observed infectious agents will be reviewed in this presentation.

 

Common Diseases of Laboratory Rats
Speaker: Krista La Perle, Professor & Director Comparative Pathology – The Ohio State University
 

Laboratory rats, like mice, are susceptible to a variety of infectious, neoplastic and miscellaneous diseases according to their background strain and age, as well as the environment and experimental conditions to which they are exposed. While quarantine and sentinel health monitoring programs have dramatically reduced the incidence of infectious diseases within vivaria over the years, clinicians, staff and pathologists must be prepared to work together to identify existing and emerging diseases in their colony. For common diseases unique to the rat, the clinical and pathological presentation, diagnosis and confounding effects on biomedical research will be covered.

 

 

Why Is it so hard to eradicate Corynebacterium bovis from a contaminated facility?
A review of potential sources of recontamination and preventive measures
Speaker: Marie DeBrue, Associate Director Technical & Veterinary Services – Pfizer

 

Corynebacterium bovis infections in immune-deficient strains of mice continue to plague many academia and industry research facilities internationally. Once present within a facility, eradication of C. bovis from infected mouse colonies has proven to be challenging. The presentation will review potential sources of contamination which can perpetuate infections within institutions, detection methods that can be used for rodent colony surveillance, and decontamination and prevention practices that can help eradicating the disease from a facility.

 

 

Common Diseases of Laboratory Mice
Speaker: Krista La Perle, Professor & Director Comparative Pathology – The Ohio State University
 

Laboratory mice, the most common animal model used for biomedical research, are susceptible to a variety of infectious, neoplastic and miscellaneous diseases according to their background strain and age, as well as the environment and experimental conditions to which they are exposed. While quarantine and sentinel health monitoring programs have dramatically reduced the incidence of infectious diseases within vivaria over the years, clinicians, staff and pathologists must be prepared to work together to identify existing and emerging diseases in their colony. For common diseases of laboratory rodents with an emphasis on mice, the clinical and pathological presentation, diagnosis and confounding effects on biomedical research will be covered.

 

© 2016 Charles River Laboratories International, Inc.