Agenda

BACK TO BASICS–RESEARCH MODELS

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Biology and Care of Laboratory Mice
Speaker: Jennifer C. Smith, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, USA

Laboratory mice continue to be the most frequently used laboratory species, making it essential to have a thorough understanding of their unique life cycle, behavior, and biology. This course will present the specific anatomic and physiologic properties of the species, as well as differences commonly associated with various strains. The humane care and use of this species and reproductive biology, including breeding colony management, will also be addressed.

The session provides the basic & essential framework of information that is pertinent for veterinarians, researchers, technicians, and animal care staff working with the laboratory mouse. The objective is to provide a thorough background of the unique biology and humane care of this commonly used laboratory species.

 

Biology & Care of Canines
Speaker: Michele Wilkinson, Director of Enrichment and Behavioral Medicine – Charles River

The basic biology and husbandry of the dog are presented, with emphasis on the areas that are unique from companion animal/pet dogs. Comparative housing schemes between the United States regulations and the European Union directive will be highlighted. Select diseases most common to both colonies of dogs and the beagle breed will be discussed. Included in the presentation is a review of normal canine behavior, best practice environmental enrichment recommendations and the abnormal behaviors typically seen in research dogs. Participants will gain an understanding of the similarities and fundamental differences between the household pet dog and the research dog and the recommendations for exemplary housing and care of research dogs.

 

Biology & Care of Laboratory Rats
Speaker: Jennifer Smith, Director – Henry Ford Hospital

Just like the laboratory mouse, the laboratory rat has unique traits, behaviors and biology that make it a common species for biomedical research. The specific anatomic and physiologic properties of the laboratory rat will be presented, as well as differences commonly associated with various strains. The humane care and use of this species and reproductive biology, including breeding colony management, will also be addressed. This course provides the basic & essential framework of information that is pertinent for veterinarians, researchers, technicians, and animal care staff working with the laboratory rat. The objective is to provide a thorough background of the unique biology and humane care of this commonly used laboratory species. Participants will review aspects of anatomy, physiology and behavior that are common to this species and their application in humane care and use.

 

Necropsy and Postmortem
Speaker: Christina Parkinson, Charles River Laboratories, Wilmington, USA

Postmortem examination, or necropsy, is an important tool in the diagnostic process. This presentation will provide an overview of a diagnostic necropsy and offer the technologist, investigator, or lab animal veterinarian a foundation on which to develop his or her necropsy skills.

The discussion will use a step-by-step format to focus on how to perform a thorough gross examination and collect and fix tissue for histopathology. Additionally, other components of the necropsy, including the antemortem exam, euthanasia methods, set-up and supplies, appropriate PPE, and ancillary testing will be addressed. Participants will also be given a brief overview of common tissues that should be viewed as part of a gross examination and images detailing normal from abnormal. Tissue collection, storage and submission will briefly be addressed.

Objective:  At the end of this one-hour talk, attendees will have acquired a basic overview of the most common diagnostic testing types for live rodents as well as the samples and their required collection and storage conditions associated with each.

 

RUMINANTS IN RESEARCH SETTINGS
Speaker: Susan Vogel, Attending Veterinarian – Charles River

This talk is intended for clinical veterinarians, scientists and technicians who may encounter ruminants in the course of their teaching and research endeavors. Cattle, sheep and goats serve as excellent research models for medicine and surgery, are crucial to the development and testing of new veterinary products, and play an important role in teaching and training. The husbandry and biology of ruminants will be addressed as well as creative methods of environmental enrichment, the importance of analgesia and anesthesia including drug options, and lessons learned in development of surgical models using ruminants.

 

RABBITS: BIOLOGY, HANDLING AND SELECTED DISEASES
Speaker: Cynthia Pekow, Chief, Veterinary Medical Unit – VA Puget Sound Health Care System

The purpose of this presentation is to provide practical information on rabbits as laboratory animals. Participants will review aspects of anatomy and physiology unique to this species, and learn how those aspects must be considered to achieve humane handling, restraint, and care of rabbits. Because intercurrent disease can affect rabbit well-being as well as their utility as research models, participants will come away with an understanding of the infectious, parasitic, congenital, and husbandry-related diseases found in lagomorphs, and how these conditions are prevented and treated. Attendees will be shown examples of humane methods for common research procedures, including restraint, blood sampling, and substance administration. Common rabbit research models will be highlighted.

 

Managing Pain for Surgical Models
Speaker: Jennifer Smith, Director – Henry Ford Hospital
 

One of the most important considerations of surgical modeling is the recognition and alleviation of associated pain. Managing pain for surgical models remains both a scientific and welfare endeavor, since inadequately managed pain can lead to adverse physical and psychological states which can have deleterious effects on research outcomes and animal welfare. Assessment of pain is an essential step to providing good pain management; however, this remains one of the most problematic barriers to good pain control when working with laboratory animals. This session will focus on species-specific pain assessment paradigms, as well as provide a review of the various agents available to treat pain in laboratory animals undergoing surgery.

 

This course will provide the essential framework of information that is pertinent for veterinarians, researchers, technicians, and animal care staff working with surgical models. The objective is to provide a thorough background of agent pharmacology & best practices for monitoring and obtunding pain in surgical models.

© 2016 Charles River Laboratories International, Inc.